• Abracada What

    Abraca…what? is a family game of deduction and spellcasting. On your turn, you try to cast one of the spells you have in front of you — but it’s harder than it looks because only the other players can see which spells are available to you! So with cunning wit, clever logic, and a little luck, you have to determine which spells to use against your competitors. Watch your magic words, though, because if you try to cast the wrong spell too often, you’ll lose the game!

  • Agamemnon

    None can defy the will of the gods but the gods themselves. Driven by the ambition of their king, the Greeks have arrived on the shores of Troy. Some seek power, some seek revenge, while still others seek the great moment in battle that will define their place in history.

  • Battle Sheep

    In Battle Sheep (first released as Splits), players start the game by constructing the board from identical four-hex tiles, then each player places his/her tall stack of discs on one of the border hexes. Players take turns removing some number of discs from the top of one of their stacks, moving that new stack of discs as far away as it can go in a straight line. Players must leave at least one disc behind when moving, so the board gradually fills up and movement opportunities become more and more scarce. The player occupying the most spaces at the end of the game wins!

  • Blokus

    Blokus (officially pronounced “Block us”) is an abstract strategy game with transparent, Tetris-shaped, colored pieces that players are trying to play onto the board. The only caveat to placing a piece is that it may not lie adjacent to your other pieces, but instead must be placed touching at least one corner of your pieces already on the board.

  • Go

    By all appearances, it’s just two players taking turns laying stones on a 19×19 (or smaller) grid of intersections. But once its basic rules are understood, Go shows its staggering depth. One can see why many people say it’s one of the most elegant brain-burning abstract games in history, with players trying to claim territory by walling off sections of the board and surrounding each other’s stones. The game doesn’t end until the board fills up, or, more often, when both players agree to end it, at which time whoever controls the most territory wins.

  • Gobblet

    Gobblet is an abstract game played on a 4×4 grid with each of the two players having twelve pieces that can nest on top of one another to create three stacks of four pieces.

  • Hive

    Hive is a highly addictive strategic game for two players that is not restricted by a board and can be played anywhere on any flat surface. Hive is made up of twenty two pieces, eleven black and eleven white, resembling a variety of creatures each with a unique way of moving.

  • Ingenious

    In Ingenious, a.k.a. Einfach Genial, players take turns placing colored domino-style tiles on a game board, scoring for each line of colored symbols that they enlarge. The trick, however, is that a player’s score is equal to her worst-scoring color, not her best, so she needs to score for all colors instead of specializing in only one or two.

  • Kingdoms

    Auf Heller und Pfennig takes participants to a medieval marketplace that looks remarkably like a plain matrix for square tiles. Each turn, players place tiles onto the board that modify (either positively or negatively) the amount of money to be made by the shops that share that tile’s row or column. Three times the board is filled with tiles and shop money is earned, after which the player with the most money wins.

  • Mastermind

    Guess the color of hidden pegs. A deduction game where each player takes turn making a limited number of guesses, using logic to deduce what pegs the opponent has hidden.

  • Mystery – Motive for Murder

    When a body is discovered in the courtyard of a stately English mansion, the weapon and location are obvious; the only questions the investigators need to answer are who and why. Every guest may have a motive, and every one of them has secrets they’re trying to hide!

  • Onitama

    Onitama is a two-player, perfect information abstract game with a random starting set-up. On a 5×5 board, both players start with five pawns on their side, with the main pawn in the middle.

  • Patchwork

    In Patchwork, two players compete to build the most aesthetic (and high-scoring) patchwork quilt on a personal 9×9 game board. To start play, lay out all of the patches at random in a circle and place a marker directly clockwise of the 2-1 patch. Each player takes five buttons — the currency/points in the game — and someone is chosen as the start player.

  • Pick and Pack

    There used to be friendly competition among co-workers at the Apple Factory during Bonus Week, as workers made a special effort to Pick & Pack those crates with quality apples.

  • Portal

    With a grinding of gears and some uneasy rumbling, Aperture Laboratories has resumed testing! Your team of test subjects has entered the Lab and is ready to perform all sorts of important, dignified, and dangerous testing procedures…all in the pursuit of cake! It’s a fun and funny fast-paced fight to the finish — and by finish, we mean your team probably died.

  • Pyramid Poker

    Pyramid Poker is a two-player design that consists of 54 wooden rectangular blocks, 52 of them with the standard card deck distribution (2-A in four suits) on one side and two of them with a pharaoh on one side.

  • Qin

    In Qin players colonize the Chinese hinterland, seize territories, and expand their influence by placing tiles and pagodas.

  • Quartex

    In Quartex, players take turns placing a tile next to other tiles already in play, growing an expansive tile field on the table. Each tile depicts one-quarter of a symbol on each corner. When you place a tile, the corners of your tile must match the corners of the adjacent tiles. If your tile provides the fourth corner of a shape, thereby completing it, you earn a point token of that color. At the end of your turn you draw a new tile, and the game ends once all the tiles have been placed or no one can add a tile to the field.

  • Quarto

    Quarto! has a 4×4 board and 16 pieces. Each piece has four dichotomous attributes – color, height, shape, and consistency – so each piece is either black or white, tall or short, square or round, and hollow or solid. The object is to place the fourth piece in a row in which all four pieces have at least one attribute in common. The twist is that your opponent gets to choose the piece you place on the board each turn.

  • Santorini

    Santorini is an accessible strategy game, simple enough for an elementary school classroom while aiming to provide gameplay depth and content for hardcore gamers to explore.

  • Seikatsu

    In Seikatsu, players take turns placing tiles into a shared garden area, with each tile showing a colored flower and colored bird. Players score for groups of birds as they place them, but they score for rows of flowers only at the end of the game and only for the rows of flowers that exist from their perspective, i.e., that are viewable as lines from where they sit at the game board.

  • Through the Desert

    Each player attempts to score the most points by snaking caravan routes through the desert, trying to reach oases and blocking off sections of the desert. Many people feel that it is reminiscent of Go.

  • Tsuro

    A beautiful and beautifully simple game of laying a tile before your own token to continue its path on each turn. The goal is to keep your token on the board longer than anyone else’s, but as the board fills up this becomes harder because there are fewer empty spaces left… and another player’s tile may also extend your own path in a direction you’d rather not go. Easy to introduce to new players, Tsuro lasts a mere 15 minutes and actually does work for any number from 2 to 8.

  • Tsuro: Of the Seas

    The basic game play of Tsuro of the Seas resembles that of Tom McMurchie’s Tsuro: Players each have a ship that they want to sail — that is, keep on the game board — as long as possible. Whoever stays on the board the longest wins the game.

  • Vortex

    Vortex is the fun board game to play with family and friends. Place the routers and the controllers and try to be the first to get to the other side of the board.